I’ll take my technical debt in a CSS selector, because of my personal skillset. At least :not has you specify. The specificity of the :not pseudo class is the specificity of its argument. If you have important information to share, please, https://caniuse.com/#feat=mdn-css_selectors_not. The :not() selector selects all elements except the specified element. This question is off-topic. One of the common CSS techniques that can be a bit tricky at first is being able to absolutely position a child div element within a parent div container, relative to the parent. JavaScript creations. All comments are held for moderation. I hope to have made myself clear. See the Pen :not(X) by GRAY GHOST (@grayghostvisuals) on CodePen. The :not() CSS pseudo-class represents elements that do not match a list of selectors. CSS Parent-Child Relationship: In CSS, the parent-child relationship is similar to the human version. I could probably write filters to control them, but that’s technical debt at a level I’d rather not deal with. CSS selector for :parent targeting (please) : > I can't count the number of times I've cursed CSS for not having a :parent pseudo selector: a img:parent { background: none; } The what followed was some going back and forth with people who have thought this properly through. In CSS, to exclude a particular class, we can use the pseudo-class :not selector also known as negation pseudo-class or not selector. So you can use :not() wherever, but we might have to hold off on using it with a list of selectors for now, like so: Selectors list inside the :not() selector is part of Selectors 4 Spec. The example holds true when looking at your demo page, where the first child of the

block is a
element but anyone not looking at the demo page is likely going to expect that the second and fourth elements are selected/displayed with a white background — since the example selector really says: select any

element that is not an odd child, whereas the image shows exactly the two odd elements as being selected. character, followed by the name of the class. I think the “:not()” selector does add to specificity. Supposedly, a parent tells the child what to do and they do it – most of the time. The :not() pseudo class does not add to the selector specificity, unlike other pseudo-classes. If the tag is “body” and the class list does not include “home” and the class list does not include “away” and the class list does not include “page-50”, then … Of course using the not yet widely available level 4 selectors (body:not(.home, .away, .page-50) would be simpler: 2n+1 is an odd number.So when you say :not(odd) should result in targeting the even numbers. ShopTalk is a podcast all about front-end web design and development. Usually the problem is that you have created two rules which could potentially apply to the same element. Example of overriding CSS style with the Class selector:¶ :). CSS class not overriding parent with * {} styles [closed] 84. In this example, the class button-primary and button-plain suggest that they inherit properties from the button class, but for them to actually inherit those properties they must be used together in the markup: This also means that you can replace all “or” (represented in CSS by “,”) with a similar construct using “:not”: is (apart from specificity) equivalent to: :not(:not(foo):not(bar)) { color: orange; }. If you want to select a parent element then you will have to resort to JavaScript. *May or may not contain any actual "CSS" They come from WordPress core or plugins. Syntax selector:not(){ properties } Example Example A. But it happened, because :not() inherits specificity. Nice article, I personally don’t need parent selectors. css class not working provides a comprehensive and comprehensive pathway for students to see progress after the end of each module. In CSS, to exclude a particular class, we can use the pseudo-class :not selector also known as negation pseudo-class or not selector. Is saying “Every li AND Every li that isn’t .menu-item should have content ●”.

This should not be bold.

Tried just in FF, but this should work, shouldn’t it? CSS 2.1 Selectors Spec. Since it is used to prevent a specific items from list of selected items. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Of course using the not yet widely available level 4 selectors (body:not(.home, .away, .page-50) would be simpler: If the tag is “body” and the class list does not include any of “home”, “away” or “page-50”, then …. The tech stack for this site is fairly boring. There is no reason not to use it. I constantly use multiple selectors like this, especially with jQuery. Example: This example uses the parents() method to get the all matched ancestors of the element. It represents an element that is not represented by the argument. it’s amazing, I’ve no idea how many times I am going to use it. I could see how this could be powerful, but I’m a little hesitant to start using this. It selects the three inner-div class … The passed argument may not contain additional selectors or any pseudo-element selectors. # parent: hover {background: green;} # parent: hover # child {background: yellow;} This will achieve the desired effect, there will be a DRY'er way with Js, but for vanilla CSS this will do the job. Instead, I got: No css-class is output to the html-sourcecode. In CSS, there is more hope as the parent design element influences the child elements within it through inheritance. ,
At some point, you will be working on a project and you will find that the CSS you thought should be applied to an element is not working. The way it’s used here makes sense especially in environments where you don’t have control over some of the environment like WordPress like you said. Essentially, just another selector of any kind. The passed argument may not contain additional selectors or any pseudo-element selectors. Try container > *:not(.some class):not(:first-child), you should have better luck chaining nots rather than chaining selectors inside a not. We group the "inheritance concept" into two categories: Derived Class (child) - the class that inherits from another class; Base Class (parent) - the class being inherited from; To inherit from a class, use the : symbol. Just straight up :not(.a) is fine, as is :not(.a):not(.b):not(.c). Being able to chain selectors within :not() is not fully supported but :not() itself is https://caniuse.com/#feat=mdn-css_selectors_not. .container > *:not(:first-child){ background:red } Oh well, good to know anyway! Since it is used to prevent a specific items from list of selected items. Essentially, just another selector of any kind. Definition and Usage. Here’s some documented proof of this in action: The moral of the story is, “the argument you pass into :not() should be less specific than what it’s chained to. I fully expected IE11 to not support it (and I’ve got a bunch of those users) but even Edge, Chrome, and Firefox are not on board yet. No single CSS solution can fix our issues here, so let’s see what JavaScript can do for us instead. The :not() selector excludes the element passed to it from selection. But there is clearly an additional layer of logic put into this pseudo class to make sure that a :not chain is self aware of the previous classes on the declaration. Check if ancestor (parent) class exist then it returns the class name otherwise returns not exist. I think it goes without saying but having chained (:not)s just seems logically confusing. I've used WordPress since day one all the way up to v17, The CSS3 selector :not() is widely supported (including IE9+). The descendant combinator — typically represented by a single space character — combines two selectors such that elements matched by the second selector are selected if they have an ancestor (parent, parent's parent, parent's parent's parent, etc) element matching the first selector. The child combinator (>) is placed between two CSS selectors.It matches only those elements matched by the second selector that are the direct children of elements matched by the first. However, a use-case I just ran into today was: You wouldn’t expect this result at all. ShopTalk is a podcast all about front-end web design and development. It selects the three inner-div class … Definition and Usage. What is only supported by Saffari is the list argument, like :not(a, b, c). The :not(X) property in CSS is a negation pseudo class and accepts a simple selector 1 as an argument. li.menu-item::before{content:none}. Damn… this :not pseudo element was made backwards…, li::before{content:”●”} I can only drop the class into an outer wrapper not the direct parent. I wasn’t even thinking of that particular code when writing this, but it makes a fairly good point. Be helpful and kind and yours will be published no problem. That’s what the :not() selector is for. In your HTML the link for your font has a space in the href. The :not () pseudo-class has a number of quirks, tricks, and unexpected results that you should be aware of before using it. :not matches an element that is not represented by the argument. The :last-child selector selects the last child. Supposedly, a parent tells the child what to do and they do it – most of the time. It is possible to style the parent element when hovering a child element, although there isn’t any existing CSS parent selector.. We’ll demonstrate and explain an example where we have a “Select” button and want to highlight the element when hovering the button. I would like to set same background color using .menu class but at the same time I also dont want to apply same color to hidden-menu class. It is not currently accepting answers. I expected to see: The css-class output to the html-sourcecode of the parent layout div. And then in your CSS, you forgot your unit in the Nav Selector padding: 10px 8;. Pseudo-class :not. Update the question so it's on-topic for Stack Overflow. I think you might be looking at selector list argument of :not(), which only works in Safari, yeah. I don’t control the classes commentPreviewButton and comment-reply-link. box-decoration-break: clone; Be mindful when using attribute selectors as some are not widely supported as others. That’s only for a list of multiple selectors, the basic implementation of :not() works across most browsers. OR is achieved through new selectors: The related posts above were algorithmically generated and displayed here without any load on my server at all, thanks to Jetpack. What I recently learned is that you can actually get burned by this matter of “argument specificity inheritance”: will have a specificity of 0,1,1,0. What it says here, is that a selector with a :not() in it will match all elements that do not match what’s between the parenthesis. Selectors that utilize a descendant combinator are called descendant selectors. They have courses on all the most important front-end technologies, from React to CSS, from Vue to D3, and beyond with Node.js and Full Stack. This selector is used to set the style to every element that is not the specified by given selector. You gave me a damn heart attack! That’s only for the selector list argument of :not(), which is the :not(.a, .b, .c) thing. Frontend Masters is the best place to get it. AND is chained. Say you want to select an element when it doesn’t have a certain class. -webkit-text-fill-color: transparent; Since it prevents specific items from being selected, it is known as the negation pseudo-class. .div-class p{font-weight: bold;} There have been occasions where I’ve wished I was able to select a parent element with CSS–and I’m not alone on this matter.However, there isn’t such thing as a Parent Selector in CSS, so it simply isn’t possible for the time being. This equates to – any a tag with an href attribute that ends in “.jpg”, “.gif”, “.png” Just add or remove whatever image file types you need. How to Add Style to the Parent Element when Hovering a Child Element. For example, span& is not allowed. Frontend Masters is the best place to get it. This is mostly used together with another selector to select everything except the specified element in a group (like in the example above). SHARE. .foo:not([class*=bar]){}; can be used/ful too! Your email address will not be published. Just wanted to point out that :not can indeed be chained per the spec: §6.6.7 http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-selectors/#negation, You’re probably using SCSS/SASS that converts it into, And my biggest problem with that, is the specificity it gains each time you add a :not. I can only drop the class into an outer wrapper not the direct parent. As we can see, the Class was placed after the ID, but the ID still takes precedence. I wonder why: You can use this. That’s what’s reflected in the content as well. To target an element that is the child of another you simply put a space between the two:. COLOR PICKER. CSS Class Inheritance in CSS. And the third rule just makes you wonder what this world is coming to. Authors should also note that since pseudo elements are not considered a simple selector, they are not valid as an argument to :not(X). }. The amount we want to “pull” to the left and right is half the width of the browser window plus half the width of the parent. Parent Selector CSS #parent-selector:checked ~ .parent{ background: #1D2DE8; } Since the parent block is just its sibling from the parent-selector checkbox, (You can see the html) In the above CSS we’ve made use of sibling selector (~)to select the parent node. We’re looking into loosening this restriction, though. The cascade, and the closely-related concept of specificity, are mechanisms that control whic… for local development. I encountered someone’s code that did not understand this concept in the wild — worse, in the Production code of a well-known CMS’s admin. -webkit-box-decoration-break: clone; /* Selects any element that is NOT a paragraph */ :not(p) { color: blue; } Try removing that. Okay so at first glance, I see two possible problems. What “not” does is specify all other element and “not” the one in the argument. a decision I'm very happy with. CSS-Tricks is hosted by Flywheel, the best WordPress hosting in the The descendant combinator — typically represented by a single space character — combines two selectors such that elements matched by the second selector are selected if they have an ancestor (parent, parent's parent, parent's parent's parent, etc) element matching the first selector.